• Yes. Purple Ice may be used in diesel engines for improved heat transfer as well as reduced cavitation.

    Purple Ice
  • No. A higher concentration of Purple Ice than recommended won? offer any additional cooling benefit nor will it have any adverse effects on the engine or cooling system.

    Purple Ice
  • When used with antifreeze, Purple Ice shoold be added once a year or every 30,000 miles, whichever comes first, in order to maintain proper performance. When using Purple Ice in a cooling system running straight water, Purple Ice shoold be added once a year or every 15,000 miles, whichever comes first.

    Purple Ice
  • When using Purple Ice with an antifreeze / water mix, Royal Purple recommends adding 1 ounce of Purple Ice per quart of cooling system capacity. For straight water (racing) applications, Royal Purple recommends adding 2 ounces of Purple Ice per quart of cooling system capacity.

    Purple Ice
  • Purple Ice may be added to any antifreeze / water mix; however, testing has shown higher water concentrations yield greater cooling benefits. While Purple Ice does contain corrosion inhibitors as well as lubricants to compensate for a lower antifreeze / water concentration, Royal Purple recommends a minimum of 20 percent antifreeze concentration be used in street driven vehicles because Purple Ice has no effect on the boiling and / or freezing point of water.

    Purple Ice
  • Purple Ice is compatible with all current OEM/factory and major brand automotive anti-freeze. This includes traditional green ethylene glycols, as well as OAT/HOAT antifreezes (e.g. DexCool; Ford and Chrysler orange, gold, pink; European and Japanese OEM red, pink, etc.).

    Purple Ice
  • Purple Ice shoold not be used with other heat-transfer or cooling enhancing products or ?ater wetters? If such a product has been used in the cooling system, the system shoold be drained and flushed before using Purple Ice.

    Purple Ice is compatible with cooling system additives intended to stop or slow leaks. Please note that such stop-leak products often typically put a coating on the interior surfaces of the cooling system, so the effects of Purple Ice may be diminished.

    Purple Ice
  • Yes. Max-Gear possesses both API GL-5 and GL-4 certification. Max-Gear is formolated with Royal Purple? proprietary, Synerlec additive technology to provide the exceptional film strength necessary for GL-5 applications, yet it is noncorrosive to soft metals found in manual transmissions that specify a GL-4 rated lubricant.
    corner graphic

    Transmission
  • No. All viscosities of Max-Gear are formolated with hypoid friction modifiers necessary for use in clutch or cone differentials. No additional additives are necessary.

    Transmission
  • For manual transmissions and / or transfer cases specifying a Ford Mercon® or GM Dexron® ATF, Royal Purple recommends either its Max ATF or for greater performance, its Synchromax.

    Transmission
  • No, Max ATF is not recommended for use in CVTs.

    Transmission
  • Max ATF is an excellent, function replacement to these fluids; however, it is not a warranty-approved fluid. Consumers still under their factory warranty shoold remain with OE fluids, while those that have exceeded factory warranty may use Max ATF as a performance upgrade.

    Transmission
  • In an ideal world, the rotary engine metered oil pump shoold inject an ashless oil designed to burn in the combustion chamber and use a four-cycle oil in the crankcase for the eccentric shaft, rotor bearings and thrust bearings. For the street, Mazda simplified the OE system to use just one oil, that being a typical four-cycle oil for both the e-shaft as well as the combustion chamber. Royal Purple recommends using our standard HP 2-C if the metered oil pump is still enabled. The two-cycle oil being added to the fuel tank is in addition to what Mazda designed to inject and acts as a supplement or insurance. Depending upon which engine, the level of modifications (street port, Bridgeport, peripheral port, nitrous turbocharged) and application, the typical mix ratio coold vary from 200:1 to 800:1.

    For a pure racing application where the metered oil pump has been disabled or removed, again based on the actual engine and modification level, the ratio coold vary from 150:1 to 600:1. For this application, we recommend our XPR 2-Cycle XPR 2-C or the standard HP 2-C.

    A stock FD twin turbo 13B with the MOP oil injection system can typically use about one quart per 1500 miles under hard street driving. If this vehicle is getting 15 mpg, the gasoline to oil ratio is 400:1. If the oil consumption on this vehicle reduces to 1 quart per 2500 miles and fuel efficiency increases to 20 mpg, the gasoline to oil ratio increases to 600:1. The stock metering oil pump is a great system as it varies with throttle position (load on the engine). Pre-mixing has to be calcolated for the ?orst case?that will be seen by the engine for that fuel load. Under racing conditions, that? wide open throttle at racing rpms. This means that at idle, the ratio may be slightly fat (rich).

    Rotary Engine
  • Royal Purple recommends that the maximum oil drain / filter change interval listed in the Owner? Manual be followed while under warranty (new RX8). For FA, FB, FC, FC Turbos and FD rotaries, extending drain intervals from two- to five-fold is possible if desired. Since the rotary engine injects oil through the use of a metered oil pump, either adding oil into the carb base plate air / fuel mixture or directly injecting oil into the rotor housing, rotary engines will consume oil of one quart per 1000 – 3000 miles. It is important to maintain the proper crankcase oil level in your rotary engine if you decide to extend oil drain intervals.

    Rotary Engine
  • No. If an engine? sealing surfaces are in good condition, synthetic oil shoold not cause any leakage. However, if an engine has marginal seals, there is a 50/50 chance the seals will leak. A synthetic motor oil is going to have similar viscosity to that of a conventional motor oil – except at extreme temperatures. Due to a flatter viscosity curve, at low temperatures it will not thicken as much (easier winter cranking) and will not thin out as quickly at higher operating temperatures (better oil film at higher rpm).

    Rotary Engine